A Solution Greater than the Problem

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7 Responses

  1. dr. bill says:

    1. the issue is not them, but the conservative and reform movements who want the chareidi hegemony in Israel broken. i am sure with r. stav or even. r. ariel, the level of rancor on all sides will subside. you won’t see rabbis intimidated for not towing a chareidi line and WOW-types having the same level of support.

    2. ms. josephs hit the nail on the head. the quarreling on this issue is regretable, overwhelming other ssociated issues.

  2. Charlie Hall says:

    Ms. Josephs has demonstrated an interest in trying to find a compromise that maintains the traditional role of the Kotel, which was never a charedi synagogue until 1967. I support her in this.

  3. Yaakov Menken says:

    Dr. Bill, you missed the point. Why do you think the Reform movement pays Anat Hoffman’s salary? Why do you think they fly her all over the USA to talk about WOW? She is leading the effort to break Torah standards.

    Don’t imagine that any more “modern” Rabbi will satisfy them. Until an immigrant from the FSU or elsewhere with neither Jewish lineage nor intent is able to marry a Jew in a Jewish ceremony in Israel, with state recognition, the Reform will be fighting for it. That’s the point I am making to Mrs. Josephs.

    Charlie, I wasn’t aware that only the chareidim observe halachah in things like Mechitzos. I think my Modern Orthodox friends would find that line highly offensive. But further, before 1967 it didn’t have a Mechitzah only because the Turks, Muslims and British wouldn’t permit it (see the comment by “PG” to my post on Political Provocation, in which he quotes Rabbi Aharon Rakeffet, who said the British, to appease the Arabs, “also did not allow the blowing of the shofar (but every year a shofar was smuggled in to the Kotel and blown)”). The Jews put up a Mechitza whenever they thought they could get away with it. Are you suggesting, a la the Niturei Karta, that we return to that situation? Wow. You make me look positively left-wing!

  4. PatentlyJewish.com (Moshe Feigin) says:

    Her conclusion starts with “here’s a solution that everyone will hate”. Given that her purpose is kiruv and that header to her solution, I don’t think she’s actually trying to argue what she really believes in. Of course she doesn’t hold of these Jews who have more in common with Kant than Moses. She’s just providing something that touches the emotions of her liberal readers, along the lines of, “can’t we all just get along?” Also, if you read between the lines in her answer, e.g. a) don’t make it a battle ground, and b) use it for personal prayer, both of those things are diametrically opposed to Anat Hoffman are not in opposition and take the wind out of her sails completely, while not that of the tens of thousands of Jews who are there every day other than the tiny group of troublemakers on either side of last Rosh Chodesh’s nonsense (Hoffman and the other noise makers).

    [Link to the Jews for kant article here? 🙂 ]

  5. Mr. Cohen says:

    Criticizing a 33-century-old faith like Orthodox Judaism for not being Egalitarian,
    is as illogical as criticizing George Washington for not wearing a disco suit,
    which did not become popular until two centuries after the American Revolution.

  6. Daniel says:

    Charlie:

    You do realize there is something highly bizarre about arguing that it traditionally was not a synagogue during the time that Jews were not permitted to go there?
    And previously during the period when we were not allowed to make a synagogue there?

    If you would like to argue that there is no need or benefit to have a synagogue there, make it from a normative viewpoint. Tell us why there is no benefit to it, or why you think the benefit is outweighed by other considerations. Don’t tell us that we should follow the Jordanian traditions.

  7. yankel says:

    The Kosel was not a synagogue before the Zionists came along. It was a makom tefilla, just like Kever Rochel today, which is not a synaggue. However, once it is sanctified as a synagogue, halocho governs its uses. Maybe we could return all synagogues back to what they were before the community established them?!

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