The OU Makes It Unanimous

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8 Responses

  1. Yonah says:

    The fact that there IS something called the Orthodox Union already makes “us” more like Episcopalianism, Methodism, and Reform Judaism.  Other than the Sanhedrin, there has never been a body that purports to define bureaucratically what exactly it means to belong or not belong to something like “Orthodoxy” (a Greek word with no equivalent in Hebrew). Of course there is Herem (a blunt tool if there ever was one) and there are Ravs of particular communities, but there has never been something like this where a meeting of politicians and bureaucrats and rabbis issues declarations of who is with us and who is against us.  G-d protect us from danning l’kaf chovah in such unnecessary ways.

  2. Steve Brizel says:

    Superb article. A most read especially for those who disregard the lessons of history at our peril

  3. Raymond says:

    With patrilineal descent, I am not so sure that so-called Reform Jews can even be considered to be Jews anymore.  I have long thought of that movement as being little more than a cover for radical Leftist politics, with a Hebrew phrase thrown in here and there, just enough to fool its Jewishly ignorant congregants into falsely believing that it is somehow a legitimate movement within Judaism.  I am reminded of how 80% of the Jews who were enslaved in Egypt, never made it out of Egypt.  They did not make it out, because they chose to assimilate into their Egyptian society.  That is precisely what appears to be happening in the American Jewish community, where at least as large of a percentage, has completely abandoned Judaism in favor of the values of American society.   It is therefore difficult for me to take seriously the notion of women Rabbis or any other change made by the Reform movement, because their whole movement, along with any other non-Orthodox forms of Judaism, are simply nonsense, frankly not worthy of our respect.  I am not against individual Jews who may not be formally religious, but I do oppose entire movements created to somehow justify that abandonment of Torah law.

  4. caren says:

    Always insightful & well researched post. Thank you.

  5. Yossi says:

    Such a well written article. As usual, the points he’s making will ring true to those who agree with him, and will be easily written off as coming from a patriarchal rabbi who’s writing apologetics.

    I think the OU should ask those four shuls to leave. For too long, as Open Orthodoxy slides further and further, we’ve continued to engage them and preach to them, and they don’t care and aren’t listening. They keep on sliding more and more, and we keep on running after them as if we’ll convince them. We won’t, so let them go and stop fighting them so much. It gives WAY too much attention to them.

  6. Yonah says:

    The fact that there IS something called the Orthodox Union already makes “us” more like Episcopalianism, Methodism, and Reform Judaism.  Other than the Sanhedrin, there has never been a body that purports to define bureaucratically what exactly it means to belong or not belong to something like “Orthodoxy” (a Greek word with no equivalent in Hebrew). Of course there is Herem (a blunt tool if there ever was one) and there are Ravs of particular communities, but there has never been something like this where a meeting of politicians and bureaucrats and rabbis issues declarations of who is with us and who is against us, and who from a distant community uses what words to describe learned women in their midst. G-d protect us from danning l’kaf chovah in such unnecessary ways.

  7. Yaakov Novograd says:

    Thank you for featuring this masterful presentation of such a crucial topic.

    (I’ve long been a fan of the classic Jews for Nothing, by the same author; although there his name appears as Dov Aharoni Fisch — vs. Dov Fischer here — Arutz Sheva seems to say they’re one!

    Thanks to this essay, I had the best more-than-five-minute chat with my 15-year-old Bais Yaakov daughter, in years.)

  8. Toby Katz says:

    See this outstanding article by Ari Zivotofsky on the question of what it means to say that mesorah — halachic tradition — can change, and whether mesorah does or can change merely to satisfy the latest fads of the zeitgeist. Incidentally, he totally gets the difference between women and turkeys.  In case you were wondering.

    –Toby Katz

    Misunderstanding Mesorah: Turkeys and Women Rabbis

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