Change Yourself; Change the World

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4 Responses

  1. josh werblowsky says:

    The interaction of the human psyche and human soul as discussed by the Rambam in Shmoneh Perakim can be developed.WHEN THERE WILL BE MUTUAL RESPECT BETWEEN MASHGICHIM AND FRUM MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS THEY EACH CAN LEARN FROM EACH OTHER FOR THE BENEFIT AND GROWTH OF OUR YESHIVA STUDENTS.

  2. Chicago says:

    Rabbi Rosenblum is 100% correct. It is very unfortunate that many of our children only get ‎guidance once they are on the street. Only once the kid risks it, is he given the hadrachah he ‎needs.‎

    Mechanchim who know gemarrah and halachah are great for the metzuyanim. But the other 85% ‎of our youth, needs rebbeim who have the understanding of the unique personality of each child. ‎Too many menahelim rely on years in kollel as the indicator of success in a classroom, paying ‎little attention to the candidate’s human interaction capability. This shortchanges far too many of ‎our youth today, setting them up for failure.‎

    Teaching and caring for neshamos is either in a mechanech’s blood, or it isn’t. No training or ‎seminars can open rigid minds, and change rigid personalities. As long as children are taught ‎with rigidity, the “at-risk” movement will flourish and grow by leaps and bounds. If the klal ‎would appreciate the mechanchim who are more open-minded, with more life experience, and ‎creativity, MAYBE our kids could receive their chinuch in a classroom instead of the street. ‎

  3. Chaim Fisher says:

    They just don’t get it.

    Here you have a nice article saying how good it would be if our mechanchim would be like this Rosh Yeshiva who actually, well, did his job and motivated his people properly. It’s not so hard if you get into it.

    Then along come #1 and #2 and translate it upside down into American values. Wrong.

    In Israel I know literally over a hundred mechanchim who have this Rosh Yeshiva’s skill, and all of them never studied with any ‘frum mental health professionals’ that #1 urges upon us, and in fact most of them relied yes indeed on ‘years in kollel’ that #2 decries.

    Now these well-meaning people are going to spend another semi-fortune hiring ‘professionals’ with ‘backgrounds’ who will import their offices and computers and secretaries into the already-bankrupt schools and schedule ‘meaningful’ events to help their students. While their principals, excuse me, schedule multi-media events proving how much yirat shemayim everybody has. With bands.

    In my child’s school in Jerusalem there is a mechanech who can barely speak Hebrew and knows more in his pinky than all the psychologists I have ever met. And guess the good news my son told me before he left this morning–they’re getting new desks without holes in them soon!

    You can see where the values are…

  4. L. Oberstein says:

    Behavioral norms can mask ethical or moral confusion. Wearin g the garb of a ben torah is helpful because it is harder to sin when you have the uniform but this doesn’t mean internal turmoil. Bad middos exist and just because someone looks holy doesn’t mean they have good middos.
    However, there is a difference. A religious person at least knows what good behavior is and realizes he or she is not up to the standard. In the general world, behaviour we consider bad is normal and there is no guilt. Don’t denigrate psychologists, often the problems are deeper than we realize. We have a lot more broken engagements today because of bad middos issues, it isn’t less because the domineering mother in law or the crooked father in law dresses in frum garb. Better a Jew without a beard than a beard without a Jew is what they used to say.

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