The Gerer Rebbe on Living with the Meltdown

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15 Responses

  1. anonymous says:

    I agree with this article and believe that it is time for klal Yisroel to wake up and see the handwriting on the wall. It clearly says that as Jews we are NOT like all of the rest of the world as well as the major shifts happening in the world are given to us by Hashem, yet as a result of our own doing.

  2. lacosta says:

    what about a side message, that learning 168 hr/wk x 5-50 yr for every newlywed bachur on the public’s expense is not a derech that is financially sustainable, absent Manna ?

  3. Avigdor says:

    As I watched brokerage account fall and my nights became more sleepless I realized that I had been banking on my “abilities” instead of the Almighty’s kindness. But I did get something for my losses, the best Rosh Hashanah davening I’ve ever had. In some ways now I hope that the market doesn’t bounce back before I am able to live with in my true means.

    Thank you for an excellent article.

  4. Steve Brizel says:

    Perhaps, the Charedi media can do their part by rejecting advertisements for vacations in exotic locations for Sukkos, Pesach, etc. As of this date, I see no evidence of any reduction of such advertising in Mishpacha.

  5. The Contarian says:

    Speaking of lavish weddings, the Israeli press reports today thatMK Litzman of Yaahdut Hatorah – Agudat Yisrael Division – Gerrer faction demanded that the election not be held on Feb 10 because Tu beshvat falls the day before amd the chassidish olam which he does not represent will be holding tischen that night and they will have difficulty getting to the polls.

    The press also mentions that the Gerrer Rebbe will be marrying off a daughter the night before the election and that all Gerrer Chasidim are expected to attend and the celebrating all night will keep many Gerrer from voting.

    I am confused. Does someone need to have 10000+ people at a wedding?

  6. tzippi says:

    I am all for being no’sei b’ol im chavero (lit. sharing the yoke with one’s friend, and yes, we all have luxuries we can give up. But that being said, for many, many of us, we are already cutting corners and there aren’t too many more left. And I never went down the latte route to begin with to be able to give it up now.

    I guess we – those in my situation – need a different chizuk shmooze.

  7. LOberstein says:

    In keeping with your article , I want to inform your readers of a new program in Baltimore to deal with the high cost of weddings. The rabbonim were concerned that at least 30-60 Baltimore weddings a year were taking place in Lakewood halls due to the lower price. The result is a fixed price wedding costing $ 10,000 including the hall at Shomrei Emunah and a sensible but but not lavish menu for up to 325 guests. This is open to anyone, not just mechanchim, as originally thought. All local caterers agreed to participate. Tonight was the first one between children of two mechanchim, who otherwise whould have make the wedding in Lakewood causing hundreds of people to travel just to save thousands of dollars. I understand that a number of weddings are already arranged and this will help bring the cost down and set a standard of modesty.

  8. Miriam says:

    “tough times may be upon us, and they are certainly upon our brethren in Israel, especially in communities and institutions dependent upon donations from abroad” (emphasis added)

    There is an additional problem here – if one doesn’t take personal responsibility for one’s finances it’s even harder to assume control, or accept new realities.

  9. Miriam says:

    Regarding the request to change the Feb 10 election date in deference to Tu BiShvat tischen and a Gerrer wedding: I don’t have issue with Gerrer Hassidim having a 10,000 person wedding, it’s a big religious inspiration for the community.

    But it’s kind of silly to say that responsible people will be too overextended from a previous night of partying to make it to their polling station before 10 pm the next night. Unless they’re the kind of people who never party, so they don’t know how to manage their partying 🙂

  10. YM says:

    I feel inspired for the moment. Thank you Rabbi Adlerstein

  11. The Contarian says:

    Miriam

    Three comments on your comments on my post

    1. The Gerrer wedding has been moved up a week.
    2. All weddings are great religious expriences.
    3. The issue is not the individual voter who can go to the polls any
    he/she wants to. It is the party polling organization that must be in place when polling starts to assist their voters to get the polls, make sure that the polls are being run fairly as far as their candidates are concerned, etc, etc.

  12. n,leff says:

    Beautiful thoughts. But we have heard it all before, to little avail. Eg, look at what happened with the takanos of the moetzes who tried to limit spending on weddings. By and large, these guidelines are being ignored. Apparently, the social pressures that lead to non-Toradik behaviour are very strong–if not insurmountable.

  13. n,leff says:

    Beautiful thoughts. But we have heard it all before, to little avail. Eg, look at what happened with the takanos of the moetzes who tried to limit spending on weddings. By and large, these guidelines are being ignored. Apparently, the social pressures that lead to non-Toradik behaviour are very strong–if not insurmountable.

  14. Yitzchok Adlerstein says:

    Rabbi Moshe Kolodny, the distinguished archivist at Agudath Israel, corresponded privately to inform me that Rashi managed to squeeze the gist of my essay into a few words. Why am I not surprised? You can find Rashi’s take in his commentary to Tehillim 112:5

  15. michoel halberstam says:

    THe real issue is whether the leadership of Mosdos who rely on the contributions of wealthy people who typify everything wrong being discussed here does not contribute to the idea that if you become wealth at any cost and any price you will get kovod. Thay being the case the question ” Ma yaaseh oso Haben shelo yechto” is very compelling.

    It is certain laudable to tell people to reduce their expectations, but who sits up fromt in shul, at the Tisch, at the Melava Malka , etc. We are witness to stories in the press every day of things happening which should not happen. But there do not appear to be any consequences to those who do these things. This is a more fundamental question that no one wants to handle. I can easily forego a souped up cell phone, but is that going to change anything.

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