The Road Taken

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5 Responses

  1. G says:

    “Two roads diverged in a wood, and I–
    I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference.”

    The key to these few lines lie not in which road was taken. The young lady you mention chose to take the road “more traveled” and she deserves kudos for that choice.
    However, it must be A CHOICE! The important point is that there were two roads.
    Too often in today’s community it seems as though only one is proffered.
    So, I commend any and all who progress down the road more traveled…but I fear sometimes that this is so only because it is the only road they see.

  2. Steve Brizel says:

    Fascinating article. I thought that it was an excellent example of how one can derive a fundamental lesson in hashkafa from a seemingly secular source.

  3. Toby Katz says:

    “The young lady you mention chose to take the road “more traveled” and she deserves kudos for that choice.
    However, it must be A CHOICE! The important point is that there were two roads.”

    ——–

    Everyone has bechira. Whether to remain true to the Torah or to abandon it is always a choice. There are always two roads (at least!)

    Usually, of course, there are myriad roads — numerous points in a person’s life where a choice must be made between the right thing and the wrong thing, or a so-so thing and a better thing.

    But R’ Shafran is right that Frost was patting himself on the back for his courage in taking “the road less traveled” and that nowadays it is quite the fashion among soi-disant intellectuals and elitists to imagine themselves as non-conformists and individualists when they are really all streaming down what they imagine to be the “road less traveled.”

    Buckley had a wry turn of phrase about Ivy League and Hollywood types who imagine themselves to be courageous individualists and non-conformists (yet all coincidentally happen to think alike on the major issues of the day). He called them “the herd of independent minds.”

  4. Ak says:

    Hi,
    I would prefer if the rabbi would compare what is hapenning in schools and graduation ceremonies with the best the ‘ world ‘has to offer , I mean progressive education where cooperative learning , community and the love of learning are the foundations. How competitive is the school , were ‘ awards’ ( rewards that are made scarce) presented? How much of the being number obsession of America still is part of frum schools. is the learning , student directed with cooperative learning , chavrutos and chaburos or mainly traditional frontal transmission of information , are rewards and punishments used to manipulate behavior ?
    I recommended previosly books by Alfie Kohn – No contest ,the case against competition , for schools he has ‘ beyond discipline , moving from compliance to community and the kids children deserve . His description of the perfect classroom is essentially the beis hamedrash with learning in pairs and groups, kids constructing information and making meaning , plenty of interaction between studens and teacher , not neccessarily through the teacher etc. Dr Sorotzkin’s articles resonate very much with what Alfie kohn is saying. traditional secular education is what we know , the road well travelled , but is it the road to reach torah goals ?

  5. Friar Yid says:

    But R’ Shafran is right that Frost was patting himself on the back for his courage in taking “the road less traveled” and that nowadays it is quite the fashion among soi-disant intellectuals and elitists to imagine themselves as non-conformists and individualists when they are really all streaming down what they imagine to be the “road less traveled.”

    And is it any better to pat oneself on the back for taking the MORE traveled road? It seems that the REAL problem here is deciding without thinking. If one is informed in one’s decision and believe it to truly be what you want, then it should not matter if it is “the norm” or not.

    He called them “the herd of independent minds.”

    A herd of any kind is a problem- be they supposedly independent, or proudly not.

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