Elul for All

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3 Responses

  1. David says:

    you know what is funny, I am pretty new with all this blog writting stuff, just plain Israeli college student who grow up amid all this outbreak of Palestinian terrorism. Since Sept 2000 when the acutal violence began between Israelis and palestinians we kept our faith, but there is point in time that you run out of faith.

    This is Elul month, time for asking forgiveness from people whom we hurt during the past year, but we were hit time after time, slandered and murdered and it seems to me that we are a bit over the hill, we have no faith anymore.

    National commission inquiry yes or not, for many Israelis is just a cover up, cover up to the real problem… and the problem is that we are worn, sick and tired.

  2. Ahron says:

    National commission inquiry yes or not, for many Israelis is just a cover up, cover up to the real problem… and the problem is that we are worn, sick and tired.

    What a poignant and unsettling comment. “Worn, sick and tired”. I feel that way from time to time. Most of us do. But it seems Israeli society, to the extent it can be generalized, is in a more chronic state of malaise. The condition of being “worn, sick and tired” seems like the symptom of a toxic inertia–stuck in a rut without either plans or goals. A condition of unguided cruise control set to continue until the fuel runs out. (I for one hope the fuel is running out.) Sounds a lot like Israel today and alot of the diaspora too.

    when the acutal violence began between Israelis and palestinians we kept our faith, but there is point in time that you run out of faith….we are a bit over the hill, we have no faith anymore.”

    Is David referring to a faith in God’s presence and care? Perhaps the chaos and malaise really has been that demoralizing. But I think David used the word “faith” to refer to a bright state of expectation and childlike hopefulness. If so I indeed hope that such “faith” has been shattered and that such illusions have been dismissed so that we can move into a state of disillusionment and begin dealing with reality instead of society-wide delusions and projections. A supposed commitment to “truth” is meaningless as long as one maintains faith in a lie.

    If we are ready to smash certain idols that is really nothing to mourn for. It will become something to celebrate after we accept the short-term pain of adjustment.

  3. Alan Kohn says:

    Introspection over Israel’s recent conflict with Hezbollah must also be combined with a healthy measure of “extrospection” (what are other countries thinking and why?). First of all, it is obvious that a well entrenched guerrilla force cannot be defeated by military means without inflicting extreme damage to the civilian communities which are sheltering these forces. This simple fact has caused and is causing major problems for those countries which have entered into such conflicts. Israel is no exception. The question then becomes: what are the alternatives to such conflicts, if any? Having asked these questions, I must admit that I have no satisfactory answers. These problems are especially difficult when combined with the threat of terrorism. Israel has the same problem as does the United States in that both of these countries have lost the support of much of the world in seeking to protect what they conceive as their interests and their security in a complex and threatening dynamic. Much of Islam has entered into a “triumphalist” phase, and is seeking to project its hegemony over ever widening domains. The tried and failed tactic of appeasement is failing again. Can we talk and compromise and work together to get out of this, or are we heading for a confrontation with weapons of mass destruction which will destroy much of civilization? I don’t know the answers, but we need world leaders (and Israel needs such leaders also) who can solve these problems while there is still time to do so.

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